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Posts from the ‘Blog’ Category

February 2014 Tribal Policy Update

The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) recently released the fiscal year 2015 Indian Country Budget Request.  This document is compiled in collaboration with tribal leaders, Native organizations, and Tribal budget consultation bodies and is intended to guide the Congress for use in the appropriations process for Indian Country.

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2014 State of Indian Nations | National Congress of American Indians

State of Indian Nations | National Congress of American Indians
1/30/14 | Delivered by President Brian Cladoosby

On Thrusday January 29th, 2014, the National Congress of American Indians hosted the 12th Annual State of Indian Nations event. It was the first SOIN presented by the new NCAI President Brian Cladoosby. As usual, the event followed the State of the Union by a few days.  Hosted at the Newseum in Washington D.C.; the event is streamed live and posted for viewing later (see the rebroadcast here).  Listen to an interview with President Clasoosby on NPR here.

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Proud to Be

Chances are, you’ll be watching the NFL Super Bowl XLVIII this weekend and chances are, you’re excited to see the big-time advertisements too.  As we know, companies go all out for this broadcast and there are often some memorable commercials.  Well, we think you’ll be moved by the ad that National Congress of American Indians has just released.  In fact, word on the street is that it isn’t just a piggyback ad, but that it will actually be aired during the Super Bowl.  It’s titled Proud to Be.

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Information on Attending or Watching the Stream of the 2014 State Of Indian Nations

Every year, just after the President of the United States gives the State of the Union address, the President of the National Congress of American Indians gives the State of Indian Nations address. This is where NCAI presents the goals of tribal leaders, opportunities to advance Indian country issues, and policy priorities for the year.
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UPDATED: Telecommunications Act Rewrite Update: House Energy and Commerce Committee Releases White Paper on Modernizing the Communications Act

Late last year, we told you about the House Energy and Commerce Committee beginning the process of what they called a multi-year effort to rewrite and modernize the Telecommunications Act of 1996; which, in and of itself, is a rewrite of the Communications Act of 1934.

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Traci Morris of Homahota Consulting Attends Women Investing in Women Summit

Recently, I was invited to attend the 2nd Annual Women Investing in Women Summit in Scottsdale.  This all-day conference held on January 11th, 2014 was jam-packed with usable information and inspiration for women business owners. The Women Investing in Women organization hosts yearly summits in South Africa, Muscat and Abu Dhabi, Sweden, Singapore and New York City.  The organization’s mission to foster economic empowerment for women globally and they are structured as a branded coalition.

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One Chickasaw Citizen’s View on the Passing of the Last Monolingual Speaker of the Chickasaw Language

“…For her, she saw the world from a Chickasaw worldview, without the interference of English at all.”

Josh Hinson, Director of the Chickasaw Language Revitalization Program

(From the recent NPR article “What Happens When a Language’s Last Monolingual Speaker Dies”)

–She was the last person who knew the world only through Chickasaw.

I am not good at languages.  I tried as an undergraduate to learn Spanish. I took an entire year of daily Spanish language classes and worked with a tutor the entire time and I was unable to learn more than a few simple phrases, not even enough to get me by living in the border state of Arizona.  What I  did learn was that I didn’t even know English grammar well enough to think about another language and its use of grammar.

However, I have to say, I’ve been hit hard by the news of the recent death of Emily Johnson Dickerson, the last monolingual speaker of the Chickasaw language. I did not know her, but she is symbolic and represents the passing of an age. Last year, I spent some time at the Chickasaw Nation and I learned that there were only about 70 some speakers of Chickasaw. At the time this alarmed me.  But, late last week we learned that the last person who had only a Chickasaw worldview had died. Well, this –to me—is staggering.  According to Chickasaw elder Catherine Wilmond, if we lose our language, the world will end (see her talk about this here).

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Tribal Leader Spotlight | Governor Anoatubby, Chickasaw Nation

As part of our ongoing series of blog posts highlighting Tribal leaders, we’re starting with the Governor of the Chickasaw Nation, Bill Anoatubby.  The Governor was first elected in 1987, becoming the 30th Governor of the Chickasaw Nation.  He is currently serving his seventh term in office.  As the tribal leader, he manages nearly 13,000 employees, 50 governmental programs, and over 100 tribal businesses, having grown the Nation from 250 employees when he took office. Check out this video history of Governor Anoatubby created by the City of Ada, Oklahoma last year.

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Tribal Telecommunications and the Rewrite of the Communications Act

Tribal reservations are among the most underserved and unserved areas in the country in terms of connectivity, with only 10% broadband penetration, nearly 30% not having access to plain old phone telephone services, many without access to 991 service, and where market forces do not encourage investment; this is where regulatory creativity is a must. As Congress begins the process of rewriting the Communications act of 1934, they must consider the needs of Tribal nations and Indian Country.

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Christmas Fun | Chickasaw Book Project Research Materials

It’s like early Christmas at the Homahota Consulting offices! We got a big order in of research books for a new book project.  As a part of my #GivingTuesday commitment, I ordered via Amazon Smile  to benefit one of my chosen non-profits, the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums.

These books will be used as primary reading and preparation for a book I’m working on about Chickasaw allotment.  The book will be a cultural biography that examines the loss of land and culture through the lens of a series of historic correspondence that took place between my great-grandmother and great-grandfather between 1907 and 1912 in Chickasaw Indian Territory.

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