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Posts from the ‘Telecom’ Category

Net Neutrality, Indian Country and the Digital Divide

One of the biggest stories in the news last week was Net Neutrality. Net Neutrality is defined by the Federal Communications Commission as “Open Internet;” although they make no mention of platforms or services. The FCC does not currently have jurisdiction to regulate the internet; hard to believe isn’t it?

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Dr. Traci Morris Presents Data Findings on Tribal Digital Inclusion from Forthcoming ATALM Study at Tribal Telecom Conference

Homahota Consulting’s Traci Morris, also an Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums Advisory Council member, spoke on February 10th, 2014 at the Tribal Telecom 2014 Conference.  As a co-author of the forthcoming Digital Inclusion in Indian Country: A National Study on the Role of Tribal Libraries, along with Miriam Jorgensen, Research Director for the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development and the Native Nations Institute at the University of Arizona. Morris presented preliminary data from the Study regarding the state of the digital divide in Indian Country to be released later this spring.

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UPDATED: Telecommunications Act Rewrite Update: House Energy and Commerce Committee Releases White Paper on Modernizing the Communications Act

Late last year, we told you about the House Energy and Commerce Committee beginning the process of what they called a multi-year effort to rewrite and modernize the Telecommunications Act of 1996; which, in and of itself, is a rewrite of the Communications Act of 1934.

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Tribal Telecommunications and the Rewrite of the Communications Act

Tribal reservations are among the most underserved and unserved areas in the country in terms of connectivity, with only 10% broadband penetration, nearly 30% not having access to plain old phone telephone services, many without access to 991 service, and where market forces do not encourage investment; this is where regulatory creativity is a must. As Congress begins the process of rewriting the Communications act of 1934, they must consider the needs of Tribal nations and Indian Country.

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