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Posts tagged ‘American Indians’

Information on Attending or Watching the Stream of the 2014 State Of Indian Nations

Every year, just after the President of the United States gives the State of the Union address, the President of the National Congress of American Indians gives the State of Indian Nations address. This is where NCAI presents the goals of tribal leaders, opportunities to advance Indian country issues, and policy priorities for the year.
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One Chickasaw Citizen’s View on the Passing of the Last Monolingual Speaker of the Chickasaw Language

“…For her, she saw the world from a Chickasaw worldview, without the interference of English at all.”

Josh Hinson, Director of the Chickasaw Language Revitalization Program

(From the recent NPR article “What Happens When a Language’s Last Monolingual Speaker Dies”)

–She was the last person who knew the world only through Chickasaw.

I am not good at languages.  I tried as an undergraduate to learn Spanish. I took an entire year of daily Spanish language classes and worked with a tutor the entire time and I was unable to learn more than a few simple phrases, not even enough to get me by living in the border state of Arizona.  What I  did learn was that I didn’t even know English grammar well enough to think about another language and its use of grammar.

However, I have to say, I’ve been hit hard by the news of the recent death of Emily Johnson Dickerson, the last monolingual speaker of the Chickasaw language. I did not know her, but she is symbolic and represents the passing of an age. Last year, I spent some time at the Chickasaw Nation and I learned that there were only about 70 some speakers of Chickasaw. At the time this alarmed me.  But, late last week we learned that the last person who had only a Chickasaw worldview had died. Well, this –to me—is staggering.  According to Chickasaw elder Catherine Wilmond, if we lose our language, the world will end (see her talk about this here).

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Tribal Leader Spotlight | Governor Anoatubby, Chickasaw Nation

As part of our ongoing series of blog posts highlighting Tribal leaders, we’re starting with the Governor of the Chickasaw Nation, Bill Anoatubby.  The Governor was first elected in 1987, becoming the 30th Governor of the Chickasaw Nation.  He is currently serving his seventh term in office.  As the tribal leader, he manages nearly 13,000 employees, 50 governmental programs, and over 100 tribal businesses, having grown the Nation from 250 employees when he took office. Check out this video history of Governor Anoatubby created by the City of Ada, Oklahoma last year.

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Tribal Telecommunications and the Rewrite of the Communications Act

Tribal reservations are among the most underserved and unserved areas in the country in terms of connectivity, with only 10% broadband penetration, nearly 30% not having access to plain old phone telephone services, many without access to 991 service, and where market forces do not encourage investment; this is where regulatory creativity is a must. As Congress begins the process of rewriting the Communications act of 1934, they must consider the needs of Tribal nations and Indian Country.

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Tribal Sovereignty | An Explanation and Some Resources

It is important to understand that tribes were not given sovereignty; rather sovereignty of tribes was and is inherent and is legally recognized initially through treaties and was later limited by laws and court rulings.

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#GivingTuesday | Supporting Native American Non-Profits

In keeping with the holiday spirit, we’re sharing our favorite Native American non-profits on this #GivingTuesday.  These are organizations that we know very well and not only work with, but fully support their mission of service to Indian Country.  The organizations include the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums; the Phoenix Indian Center; and, Native Public Media. We hope you’ll consider supporting them too.

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November 2013 Policy Update

November 6, 2013

Despite the government shutdown, October was a very busy month! The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) held their 70th annual convention in Tulsa, Oklahoma and the National Center for American Indian Economic Development (NCAIED) held their regional meeting in Phoenix, Arizona.  Additionally, the minute the federal government opened back up for business, agencies scrambled to start the new fiscal year and to hold consultation meetings with tribes.  Finally, preparation began for the White House Tribal Nations Summit  held in November.
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October 2013 Policy Update

October 10, 2013

With so much happening in Washington D.C. in the past 30 days, this policy update is focusing directly on these issues.  The information contained in this month’s policy update is via the National Congress of American Indians; they are on the front lines representing tribes and tribal interests in Washington D.C. Please note, some of the website links may not work; they are not broken, but the Federal government is shutting down some sites during the government shutdown. More information here.  On an October 1, 2013, NCAI issued a statement urging congress to reach a long-term budget deal that meets the nation’s obligations to tribal nations.
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